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Monthly Archives: April 2017

Interior Repair Techs

1) Rush your work. Yup, time is money, so don’t take your time…haul ass and finish in seconds. Who cares how the repair looks anyways..

2) Don’t color test your dyes prior to redying. Just spray and hope. I mean, why would you want to be sure the leather dye on that Mercedes is a spot on match, right? Heck, it might take you 2-3 minutes to do so..

3) Use cheap products. Yeah, everyone says good products keep your business coming back and save you time, but spray paint and household glue from Home Depot are SO cheap! Use crap products…

4) Don’t grain your leather and vinyl repairs. Yeah, just fix the rip or tear or hole, and then fill and dye. Sure the area texture wont match and will be smooth and standout like a sore thumb, but time is money… so move on.

5) Don’t remove a stain, always dye it. Sure, it might come right up with Acetone, but that would be too easy. Complicate it…use a spray dye, or better yet a spray paint from your Home Depot run..a surefire way to have more problems.

Tips Negotiate Car Repairs

Car repairs can be negotiated just like anything else, more so even. Your mechanic or service manager at the dealer, knows for a fact that you are being over charged, that means that all you have to do is ask for a discount. If your mechanic is worth his salt he calls you before he does any work on your car, that is when the negotiation should start. When your mechanic tells you that you need a new “flex capacitor” and it cost around $800, your first reaction should be “Can you give me a better price?”
Or better yet “Can you do it for $700” . You need to make it clear from the very beginning that you want a discount. A ten percent discount is always a good starting point, you are only trying to get a small discount, which is better than nothing. The biggest mistake you can make is to wait until your car repair is finished. At that point he basically is holding your car hostage until you pay him, so that means he is in full control of the negotiation. The very little control we do have is before any work is done, because we still have the ability to say no thanks I’ll take it somewhere else.

Most people want a discount, but most people don’t like negotiating. Let’s face it, it’s not for everybody. The reason car repair is set up for negotiation is because your mechanic or service manager knows that he can give you a discount but he certainly is not going to offer it. You’ll be surprised to see how easy they will give you 10% just for asking. The next time your you need a car repair follow these steps to get a 10% discount::

1. Make sure you tell the service manager or mechanic to call you BEFORE he does any work to your car.

2. Always ask for an estimate when he tells you what repairs you need.

3. What ever amount he says, ask for at least for a 10% discount. It’s much better saying a specific price instead of 10%, so make sure you have your math ready.

Chilton Manuals

The Chilton Publishing Company originated in 1922 as a publishing house for automotive periodicals. Over the years, their publishing expanded to include other industries, earning a reputation as the premier authority on mechanical information and repair. The company has always prided itself on accuracy and reliability, and the trust their manuals have instilled in both laymen and professionals accounts for the wide demand of Chilton repair manuals throughout the automotive world. A Chilton Manual focuses on a specific line of cars during a set range of years (e.g. Buick Regal/Century 1975-1987). It covers all parts in the car, explaining size, feature, and function. This level of detail proves invaluable when something small on the car malfunctions, and the owner decides to purchase a replacement and install it at home. Without the specifics available through a Chilton repair manual, this would be virtually impossible. Furthermore, beginning mechanics find Chilton repair manuals useful as learning tools because they actually explain the cause and effect relationships of the automobile’s mechanical systems. For the newcomer to home auto repair, the step-by-step instructions and the detailed diagrams and photographs teach the repair process as much as they assist in its completion. It goes without saying as well that high school auto shop teachers use Chilton repair manuals more than they do their auto repair textbooks, and they train their students in how to use the manual both for safety purposes and for knowledge of the craft.

Almost everyone who associates daily with automobiles either has on hand or frequently uses a Chilton repair manual. Classic car enthusiasts rely upon them for both parts and assembly instructions vital to the restoration process. Owners of older vehicles simply cannot rely upon anything other than a Chilton repair manual simply because the typical service chain keeps pace with newer automotive models and often tells the proud owner of a vintage car to take it to a special shop or buy a new car. As we mentioned earlier, students and first-time mechanics use Chilton repair manuals for everything from learning how to change the oil, replace spark plugs and check manifold intake systems, and troubleshoot electrical problems by using a Chilton manual’s electrical wiring diagrams essential to understanding today’s integration of computer technology into the modern vehicle. In fact, vehicle owners doing any type of electrical work on their vehicle need to strongly consider using Chilton as their guide, as much of today’s sophisticated technology can actually pose a danger even to a mechanic skilled in traditional automotive repair but unfamiliar in new wiring and computer hardware. With a Chilton repair manual, even a professional can learn and grow as technology continues to evolve.

Extended Warranties

Extended warranties are supposed to pay (in full or in part) for specified repairs for a specific period of time after the expiration of the factory warranty. They can be a great value. They can also be a significant waste of money. It gets quite foggy in the details. What exactly is covered? How long? How much? Are there hidden charges?

There are numerous extended warranty companies and an even wider variety of warranty packages available: silver, gold, platinum, platinum-plus, and a host of other confidence-building words. What’s the best plan, and are extended service contracts worth the money?

Extended warranties, like life insurance policies, are a numbers game. They’re a gamble. You pay $2500-$4500 for a 2 year, 100,000-mile protection plan and hope that you get at least that back in warranty repairs. The provider on the other hand, hopes to pay out less than it insured.

There are three major types of plan providers: The manufacturer, the dealership/third party, and third party providers. Each one has its assets and liabilities (discussed ahead).

What exactly is covered in an extended service plan? As mentioned above, what’s covered depends on the package purchased. Some plans only cover the power train: the mechanical components of the engine, transmission, and rear-end. Others cover the power train plus some electrical components. Still others cover electrical, advanced electrical, and computer components. Some only cover what’s listed in the contract. This is called a “Stated” or “Named” contract. This means that if it’s not stated, it’s not covered. Some cover bumper-to-bumper, similar to a manufacturer warranty, except trim pieces, upholstery, exterior components, cosmetic items, and a number of other exclusions.